Category: Culture

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"Brunettes Shoot Blondes" indie rock band performing their latest song “Houston" using a broken, vintage grand piano.

“Brunettes Shoot Blondes” Band Transforms Piano Into an Orchestra

In today’s digital world, where different instruments and sounds can be added to a song in just a push of a few buttons, one Ukrainian music band stands out for its persistence in using actual instruments. Brunettes Shoot Blondes, an indie rock band from Kiev, has transformed a broken 19th-century grand piano into a versatile musical machine that is capable of playing 20 different instruments.

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Artist Benjamin Von Wong's "Strawpocalypse" installation.

#Strawpocalypse: Using Art to Help Save the Environment

“It’s just one straw, said 8 billion people.” This line is what inspired Canadian photographer and artist Benjamin Von Wong to create his latest socially conscious art installation “The Parting of the Plastic Sea.” The stunning art piece is currently on display at the atrium of the Estella Place retail mall in District 2 of Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, until March 24, 2019.

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Detail of model wearing a Thierry Mugler haute couture garment.

“Thierry Mugler: Couturissime” Exhibition at the MMFA

Mugler, who was born in Strasbourg, France, and studied dance before turning to design, is known for more than just his hyper-feminized fashion and perfume creations. A talented photographer and filmmaker, he has worked with the likes of singer George Michael and actress Juliette Binoche. He has also created costumes for the Festival d’Avignon and Beyoncé’s tours and music videos.

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A boat full of people riding back from one of the uninhabited islands around Pingelap, photographed with infrared filters by Sanne De Wilde.

A Photographic Immersion in “The Island of the Colorblind”

In the great expanse of the South Pacific, northeast of Papua New Guinea and southwest of Hawaii, lies Pingelap Atoll, a collection of three small islands in Micronesia. Only the largest of these islands, which is less than 2.5 miles wide at its widest point, is inhabited. Despite the small size of their home, the 250 or so residents of Pingelap have attracted a fair bit of attention from researchers, scientists and now, artists.