Hong Kong’s Famous Concrete Jungle

"Monster Building" in Quarry Bay, Hong Kong
“Monster Building” in Quarry Bay, Hong Kong

Known as “Monster Building,” the concrete giant, located in Quarry Bay in the Eastern District of Hong Kong Island, in Hong Kong, is an E-Shaped complex that has been a favorite location among curious observers and Instagrammers. The hulking behemoth is composed of five interconnected residential towers: Fook Cheong Building, Montane Mansion, Oceanic Mansion, Yick Cheong Building, and Yick Fat Building.

The pragmatic architecture of the “Monster Building” thoroughly conveys the atmosphere of the utilitarian simplicity of postwar Hong Kong giving simultaneously a glimpse of one of the most densely populated cities in the world.

Nowadays, Hong Kong attracts tourists for its iconic skyline, featuring the most skyscrapers in the world, glowing neon lights, attractive shopping venues, delicious local cuisine, beautiful nature, outdoor adventures and colorful traditions.

In the 1950s and 1960s, post-WWII Hong Kong experienced an overwhelming population growth as a massive influx of refugees flooded the city to avoid the political turmoil in mainland China. The social crisis led to a severe housing shortage forcing the Hong Kong government to launch a public accommodation program to house the city’s low-income residents. As a result, the apartments of the “Moster Building” along with other housing properties became densely populated creating a concrete beehive.

"Monster Building" in Quarry Bay, Hong Kong
“Monster Building” in Quarry Bay, Hong Kong

This colorful and cohesive tapestry of residences and household shops has served as the location for multiple films, including “Transformers: Age of Extinction” and “Ghost in the Shell.” Its chaotic symmetry and aesthetically stunning architecture have also created a hot spot for city explorers and amateur photographers seeking the perfect shot. Unfortunately, we should not be expecting any new photographs soon, as the large influx of visitors has recently led to a photography ban to respect the privacy of the residents.

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