Tag: Travel Ideas

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Mural of a Mexican man flexing his muscles

10+1 Things Not to Miss in El Paso, Texas

Are you getting ready to take a trip to El Paso, but you’re unsure of what you should do while you’re there? El Paso tourism has been on the rise for years, and the latest data show the city receives nearly nine million visitors per year. From delicious Tex-Mex food and incredible desert vistas to famous historic sights and cultural attractions, there is plenty to experience in this fabulous city.¬†Read on to learn about some of the top things that you shouldn’t miss when visiting El Paso, Texas.

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Woman wearing an impressive long skirt photographed by Kristina Makeeva in Lake Baikal, Ruusia

Lake Baikal: Where Fashion and Fantasy Run Deep

Lake Baikal, known as the “Pearl of Siberia,” is the world’s oldest and deepest known lake. Reaching depths of nearly a mile, the ice layer on the surface reaches a thickness of over six feet during the winter months. Lake Baikal’s crystalline ice formations and its endless palette of reflected colors are more reminiscent of an artist’s canvas than a simple body of water.

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Old photo of Fast Fanny's Place (a former brothel) in Oatman, Arizona

Oatman, Arizona: The Friendliest Almost-Ghost Town in the West

In the late 1800s, the bustling town of Oatman, Arizona, was overflowing with miners who hoped to stake their claim on some of the millions of dollars in gold and silver from the surrounding mountains. The town was named after a Mormon teenager named Olive Oatman who, as the locals tell it, was captured by Apache warriors, sold to a Mojave tribe, and eventually freed after five years of captivity.

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The colorful Yuncheng Salt Lake in China

China’s Yuncheng Salt Lake: A Kaleidoscope of Color

For thousands of years, Yuncheng Salt Lake has served as an important source of salt for residents all over China. Located in the Shanxi Province in Northern China, the lake, nicknamed “China’s Dead Sea,” has been the focus of numerous wars, territorial disputes, and religious traditions for over 4,000 years. Ancient people even worshipped “salt gods” in nearby temples to pay homage to the lake.