The Baroque-Style Underwater Masterpieces of Christy Lee Rogers

“A Dream Dreamed in the Presence of Reason” 2018. Muses Collection. Christy Lee Rogers Photography

For her latest series, titled “Muses,” Hawaiian-born visual artist Christy Lee Rogers created large-scale radiant images of ethereal figures, wrapped in colorful fabrics, submerged in illuminated water and photographed at night, aiming to expose “the vulnerabilities and beauty of the human body in an underwater setting.”

After having been exhibited at Art Labor Gallery in Shanghai, China, the Baroque-style “Muses” collection, will be on view at PHOTOFAIRS|Shanghai from September 21 through September 23, 2018.

“These final images represent a soft and peaceful place that I imagine exists, where you can be free to let go and experience the beauty surrounding you,” Rogers, a pioneer in underwater photography, shared in a recent interview with PHOTOFAIRS|Shanghai.

“Harmony 2018. Muses Collection. Christy Lee Rogers Photography

Grown up in Kailua, Hawaii, Christy Lee Rogers currently lives in Nashville, Tennessee, where she strives to “question and find understanding in the craziness, tragedy, vulnerability, beauty and power of mankind.”

“Awaken” 2018. Muses Collection. Christy Lee Rogers Photography
“Alive” 2018. Muses Collection. Christy Lee Rogers Photography

Rogers’ masterpieces have been showcased in many cultural hubs throughout the world in Italy, London, Los Angeles, Mexico City, Paris, Sao Paulo, Shanghai, and South Africa, while international publications such as Vogue, Casa Vogue, Harper’s Bazaar Art China, Elle Decoration, and The Independent, have featured her work. One of the American photographer’s most recent creations is an underwater art film for beauty, perfume line “Phuong Dang.”

“Our Hopes and Expectations” 2018. Muses Collection. Christy Lee Rogers Photography
“Evolution” 2018. Muses Collection. Christy Lee Rogers Photography

Adam Jacques successfully concentrated all the qualities of the artist’s works in the following description that was published in “The Independent” in London in 2013: “The ethereal payoff is indeed redolent of a mix of Masters – the vivid hues of Titian, the straining bodies of Rubens, the sun-dappling chiaroscuro of Caravaggio, but also the loose brushstrokes and fluid movement of Delacroix; hints, too, of the Tiepolo-esque heavenly ascents adorning many an 18th-century Venetian chapel.”

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